Happy New Year!

Hopefully, 2012 was a year that passed with good friends by your side and precious moments spent with your loved ones. As winter creeps in, I appreciate the chilled beauty all around me and stay warm by drinking lots of scorching hot tea. I always read a bit more during the frozen months, plus my mind races with short story ideas, and poems emerge with a distinctly cold bite to them.

Short stories and poems need to be published! So check out this post to venture into the exciting land of submissions. Keep in mind while searching for markets these all-important things…

  • Read the guidelines for each market carefully. If said magazine or e-zine states they only accept literary poetry and fiction, then do not submit horror, fantasy, or science fiction.
  • Take notice if the market for your work accepts simultaneous submissions (submit that poem or story to other markets at the same time) and/or multiple submissions (submit more than one piece at a time), and if your chosen market accepts reprints.
  • Read examples of what has been accepted to that market to provide a better idea of what those editors are drawn to. Some editors are all about surreal experiences that can be interpreted differently by each reader, yet others prefer details galore that make sure the reader gets exactly what the writer is saying. It’s fun to write both ways, so give it a try!
  • Does the market insist upon a bio and intro letter? Most of the time, I’ve included these with my submissions. If it is stated no such things are welcome, then do not send them. Why would an editor not want a bio or cover letter? I’ve worked with a handful of editors who want to judge a piece solely on its own merits and not the background of the writer. If the piece is accepted, then a bio may be requested.
  • If possible, find a submission editor’s name to use with your submission. It shows you have taken a little extra time to read about that market.
  • Unless the publisher’s guidelines state otherwise, use industry standard manuscript formatting. What is that, you ask? Check out William Shunn’s post on industry standard manuscript formatting.
  • Does the market pay? You must decide if this matters, but be sure you know before agreeing to anything.

MARKETS

IDEOMANCER: One of my favorite markets, Ideomancer publishes speculative fiction and poetry. Their guidelines state, “We want unique pieces from authors willing to explore non-traditional narratives and take chances with tone, structure and execution, balance ideas and character, emotion and ruthlessness. We also have an eye for more traditional tales told with excellence.” Their site is beautiful, and the work published is top-notch.

INTERSTELLAR FICTION: If writing about little, green Martians, robots gone mad, or Slide1doomsday devices are your thing, check out this market. Interstellar Fiction loves the old clichés, but if something new blows them away, chances are a publishing credit is coming your way.

THE SOUTHERN REVIEW: You’ll have time to submit to The Southern Review because unsolicited fiction and nonfiction is only accepted (postmarked) September 1st through December 1st, and unsolicited poetry is accepted (postmarked) September 1st through February 1st. If you have poetry ready to go, hurry and submit! Fiction, poetry, essays, including nonfiction and literary essays that are previously unpublished, are considered. Simultaneous submissions are permitted but they ask to be notified promptly if your work is accepted elsewhere.

PERIHELION: If hard science fiction is what you write best, I hope you submit to Perihelion. This e-mag says, “No fantasy. No horror. No fan fiction. No poetry. Stories do not necessarily have to restrict themselves to robots, rocket ships, and extraterrestrials. However, the science and/or technology must be integral to the story. If you remove the science, the story falls apart, or disappears altogether. If the plot can be easily reconstituted as a western, a swashbuckler, or a bodice-ripper, it is probably not for us, either.” Doesn’t this sound like a challenge? I really want to submit to this market!

THE BARCELONA REVIEW: All genres and a diverse styles and techniques are all open game at The Barcelona Review. “We’re after original, potent and powerful writing with a contemporary feel that is literarily sound; writing marked by a strong sense of imaginative distinction. (We do not publish tales, fables or re-worked fairy tales; nor are we after vignettes.)” Submit!

ABANDONED TOWERS MAGAZINE: A market for fiction, poetry, and non-fiction, Abandoned Towers Magazine has an online presence for fantastic reading material and a print publication as well. Guidelines are listed for Art, Books for Review, Audio, Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, and Video, so take your pick and submit.

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S MYSTERY MAGAZINE: A publisher of crime, mystery, and suspense short stories, AHMM has delighted readers for over fifty years by releasing mystery fiction of “the broadest range and the highest quality, featuring every subgenre of mystery fiction.” Kirkus Reviews adds, “The lack of a specific house style is its greatest strength.” This is an impressive market because many stories featured in AHMM have won dozens of awards, including numerous Robert L. Fish awards for Best First Mystery Short Story of the year. Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine features 12 issues (8 single issues and 2 double issues). Guidelines here.

PRISM: A quarterly magazine whose home is Vancouver, British Columbia, Prism International’s mandate is to “publish the best in contemporary writing and translation from Canada and around the world. Writing from PRISM has been featured in Best American Stories, Best American Essays and The Journey Prize Stories, amongst other noted publications.” Regular features include creative non-fiction, drama, and translations.

FIND MORE MARKETS

NEWPages.com: Do dreams come true? If you dream about a huge listing of links for literary marketsNEWPages.com states, “The most up-to-date and reliable lists of literary magazines on the web.” An example listing for Sliver of Stone shows a writer everything needed to pursue this market. Emerging and established poets, writers, and visual artists from all parts of the globe are welcome to submit.

Speculative Literature Foundation: Speculative fiction is close to my heart, so this absolutely amazing list of market links is one to visit if you’re all about science fiction, fantasy, and horror.

Ralan.com: Providing links to speculative writing markets for over sixteen years, Ralan.com is a site I often visit.

Good luck submitting in 2013, and if you know of a great market, leave a comment!

Thanks for visiting the Noracast.

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